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How to Level Your Travel Trailer Tips

If you don’t like spending your vacation at an angle, you’ll have to learn how to level your travel trailer. But it’s not just about making you feel better. Leveling your travel trailer is important for a number of reasons. It will make your trailer more stable, and it will also prevent all the accidents that can happen in an unlevel trailer, especially when you’re cooking. And some propane refrigerators won’t work properly if the trailer isn’t level! There are many reasons to level your travel trailer, and it doesn’t take much time to learn how. So we here at Ryan’s RV Town decided to create this brief guide to teach our customers the best way to level their trailers. If you need parts or services for your travel trailer, don’t hesitate to stop by our location in Everett. We’re conveniently located near Tacoma, Bellingham, and Vancouver, and we can help you with all of your RV needs.

Pick Your Spot

One of the most important parts of leveling your travel trailer is picking the spot where you plan to park. If possible, try to reserve a level spot ahead of time so you don’t get forced to take whatever spot is left. You should also try to find a spot that’s free from overhanging trees or other potential hazards.

Level Left to Right

When your spot is picked out, choose where specifically you are going to park your trailer, then park your trailer about a foot or two in front of where you want it to end up. Then, check the level at the tongue of your trailer. Use this measurement to start estimating how much you need to adjust for in your side-to-side leveling. Then, put leveling blocks or boards behind the wheels of your RV and slowly back up onto them. Check the level once again and add or subtract blocks until the trailer is level from left to right. A note about those leveling blocks or boards: using scrap wood is fine for this task, but make sure that it’s free of nails or other metallic objects that could puncture your tire. Also, make sure the board is wider than your tire, as a narrow board will apply unnecessary stress to your tire.

Chock the Tires, Unhook from the Hitch

Once you’ve got your trailer level from side to side, you’ll want to keep it in place. Use wheel chocks or more boards for this. Push the chocks under the tires so that the tires can’t roll anywhere. Then, head back to the hitch and unhook the trailer from the tow vehicle. Make sure to disconnect the safety chains and electrical harness as well as the ball joint connection. Drive the tow vehicle clear away so that you can complete the next step.

Level Front to Back

Leveling your trailer from front to back is the easy part. Use the jack at the tongue to raise or lower the hitch until the trailer is totally level. Remember to change the orientation of your level so that it’s measuring the correct axis.

Stabilize

Now that your trailer is level, you’ll want to make sure it doesn’t move around. This is what the stabilizers are for. Stabilizers are little jacks on the four corners of your travel trailer. Deploy these by inserting the crank rod and turning until they extend to the ground. Don’t put too much pressure on once you hit the ground or you will throw off your level. It might be tempting to try to actually level your trailer with these from the beginning. This system is not only inefficient and time consuming, it can also be damaging to the stabilizers which are constructed for only one purpose.

Leveling your trailer isn’t difficult if you follow these steps. Give it a shot on your next trip! And if you have any problems or if you need any repairs to your travel trailer, think of Ryan’s RV Town in Everett, Washington. We’re the home for everything RV in the Puget Sound area, and we serve customers in Seattle, Tacoma, Bellingham, and Vancouver, Washington. GIve us a call today!

 

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